WesTech Commercial/Industry Blog

Industrial

Converting Wastewater Algae Into High-Value Resources

Posted by Floyd Griffiths on Oct 13, 2016 2:26:40 PM

 

Originally published in Water Environment Federation's World Water Magazine

In a corporate-academic partnership unique to algal research, WesTech Engineering, Inc. and Utah State University’s Sustainable Waste-to-Bioproducts Engineering Center (SWBEC) are developing processes for more efficient harvesting of algae from municipal wastewater and other nutrient-rich sources. Floyd Griffiths of WesTech Engineering, Inc. reports on joint research efforts for converting algae into high-value bioproducts.

Corporations frequently establish joint research partnerships with universities in diverse fields; however, such collaboration seldom occurs in algal research, which has almost exclusively remained within the province of universities.

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Category: Industrial Water Reuse, Multi-Barrier Water Treatment, Wastewater Treatment, Water Treatment

Paste Thickening Optimizes Tailings Disposal and Water Recovery

Posted by Jeff Easton on Aug 3, 2016 10:49:34 AM

Mine tailings disposal, and its impact on water usage, is an important concern for any mining company. The challenge today, whether extracting aluminum, zinc, gold or iron ore, is how to dispose of tailings material such that it is contained and stable, while maximizing water reuse and minimizing surface footprint.

Paste, or thickened tailings, has become an increasingly important method to address many of the environmental problems facing the mining industry. Pasting was originally developed by the alumina industry in the 1970s, and for the past 20 years has been applied worldwide.

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Category: Paste Thickening

Paste Thickener Design to Achieve Downstream Requirements

Posted by Jerold Johnson on Jul 11, 2016 6:05:12 PM

Paste, or thickened tailings, have become an increasingly important method to address many of the environmental problems facing the mining industry. The term “paste” as used in this discussion applies to the full range of non-settling tailings that exhibit a yield stress such as “thickened tailings” and “mine paste backfill.”

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Category: Paste Thickening

Thickener Feed System Design

Posted by Philip Lake on Jun 14, 2016 3:32:35 PM

Philip Lake reviews WesTech's EvenFlo™ feedwell design for the even distribution of the feed slurry in order to provide the end user with the most economical thickener in terms of reagent consumption and size.

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Acid Mine Drainage Treatment

Posted by Brett Housley on May 17, 2016 3:16:46 PM

Photo courtesy of Yukon News and CMS Photos

Acid mine/rock drainage is a rampant problem in the world today. The above photo depicts acid drainage at an abandoned mine in the Yukon Territory of northwest Canada. This mine shares a similar history to thousands of other mines throughout the world. It was in operation for six short years in the 1950’s, producing gold ore. Its profitability eventually failed and it was abandoned. In the years following, the mine changed ownership several times, making it very difficult for the government to enforce treatment for the acid rock drainage that the mine created.

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Category: Acid Mine Drainage Treatment

Clarifier Maintenance

Posted by Jess Kelley on May 3, 2016 12:40:48 PM

Clarifiers are expensive, to buy or repair, and their downtime can be costly in fines imposed by regulatory agencies and in community ill will. Regular maintenance, an annual inspection of the mechanism and an occasional touchup of the paint or coating system are simple and inexpensive proactive steps that will usually prevent most problems. Three components of all clarifiers require maintenance: the effluent system, the sludge removal system and the drive. The effluent and sludge removal systems require maintenance only occasionally, whereas the drive requires regular maintenance.

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Category: Clarifier Maintenance

Landfill Leachate Treatment

Posted by Rick Szilagyi on Apr 12, 2016 12:27:05 PM

Landfills are categorized by regulations in three types: industrial, municipal, and hazardous. Individual landfills may be further differentiated by the types of waste which they accept.

All landfills are required to be capped, usually occurring at the end of each day. The cap is typically 6-8” of soil. The cap reduces odor and loss due to wind. At the closing of the landfill, a permanent cap consisting of a membrane and more soil is added.

Before the landfilling operation begins, an “impermeable” base is required. This usually consists of two layers of membranes separated by at least 12” of sand. A network of drain pipes is buried in the sand. These pipes transport the wastewater that must be treated.

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Category: Landfill Leachate Treatment